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Hair Salon inMoncks Corner, SC

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Find the Beauty in You at Chroma Hair Studio & Spa

Choosing the right hair salon in Moncks Corner, SC, is a little bit like finding the perfect outfit. The materials feel great on your skin, the fabric is flattering to your body type, and when you try it on, you just know - this is the outfit that you have been looking for.

With thousands of hair salons and stylists in South Carolina, choosing the right one can be difficult. You want a salon that is clean, comfortable, and chic. But, more importantly, you need a stylist that "gets" you. Someone who takes the time to understand your preferences, your style, and your personality. You need a stylist who listens, is honest, and has the technical skills to turn your vision into a reality.

An excellent stylist epitomizes all those traits and knows how to adapt to changing beauty trends. They aren't afraid to take on a challenge.

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Welcome to Chroma Hair Studio & Spa

Where the most talented hairstylists in Moncks Corner help bring out the beauty in each of our clients. We strive to provide each of our customers with the highest levels of customer service in the beauty industry. At Chroma, we offer a relaxing environment, skillful professionals, and a variety of products with environmentally safe and good-for-you ingredients.

Our goal is to make your salon experience special, from the moment you walk in to the second you leave. With a variety of professional hair and beauty services to choose from, we're sure you will rediscover the "beauty of you" every time you visit our salon.

Here are just a few of our most popular hair and beauty services in Moncks Corner:

The key to a great haircut and salon experience is to understand the services we offer, so you can choose the best selection for your needs. What do our salon services entail? Keep reading below to find out.

Hair Studio Moncks Corner, SC

Professional Hair Color in Moncks Corner, SC

Let's be honest: DIY hair kits can be tricky to get right. They can be complicated to apply and usually have hard-to-understand instructions. Half the time, the color you're left with looks nothing like it does on the front of the box. In a perfect world, you should be able to pop into Target, pick a boxed hair color, apply it at home, and emerge out of your bathroom with a new, beautiful hair color. For most people, this never happens.

That's why people who want flawless color, professional application, and ease of convenience get their highlights at Chroma Hair Studio & Spa.

Whether you are changing your hair color completely or just want a few highlights to switch things up, we are here to create the look and style that you've been dreaming about. At Chroma Hair Studio & Spa, we specialize in the latest hair coloring trends using cutting-edge technology. That way, our clients get the freshest looks, coolest colors, and longest-lasting highlights in town. When you get your highlights done at our hair salon in Moncks Corner, we want you to leave excited and ready to share your new hair all over social.

Don't spend hours in the store trying to find the color you think will look great on you. Our team of professional stylists will consult with you about your vision and craft a custom highlight plan that fits you're your unique style. There's a reason why so many customers trust us with their highlights - we genuinely care about your hair and how it looks.

Our professional hair coloring services in Moncks Corner are a combination of art and science. The artistic results only last as long as the hair coloring products used, and we use the best. Our hairstylists and colorists are committed to helping you look and feel fabulous, whether you're planning a special occasion or just want to impress that special someone.

 Women's Hair Studio Moncks Corner, SC

Get the Look You Crave with Personalized Hair Treatments

Ever taken a chance on a new look or hair color, only to end up embarrassed and unsatisfied with the results? You're not alone - we get calls every week from people just like you who need hair treatment Moncks Corner. Sadly, sometimes even the professionals get a color procedure wrong.

Other times, your hair has suffered from years of blow-drying and straightening, and it looks dry, brittle, and unattractive. You know you need a deep conditioning treatment, and you need it ASAP.

At Chroma Hair Studio & Spa, our technicians have treated all sorts of hair problems - from unprofessional coloring with multiple bands of different colors and tones to dehydrated hair and more. Sometimes, our client's entire hairstyle needs to be corrected. To do this, we stock multiple types of color and toners to revitalize hair and give it the color you've been dreaming of. Our team always puts a priority on the health and integrity of your hair, whether it's your first visit or your fortieth.

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 Women's Haircut Moncks Corner, SC

Voluptuous Eyelash Extensions in
Moncks Corner, SC

Do you ever wake up in the morning and wish that you had fuller, longer eyelashes? You're not alone - thousands of people crave darker, thicker lashes. They settle for what they have, not knowing that a revolutionary lash treatment is waiting for them at Chroma Hair Studio & Spa.

Eyelash extensions have revolutionized fashion culture, saving women untold amounts time and effort in front of the makeup mirror. The great news is that lash extensions aren't just reserved for Hollywood celebrities anymore. Anybody can have the long, fluttery lashes they've been craving, with a trip to our salon.

Eyelash extensions are a fabulous way to enhance your look on a long-term basis and provide you with a small change that makes a huge impact. From the moment you wake up to the time you go to bed, your lashes remain long, sexy, and sultry.

Our eyelash extension specialist works with your existing lashes to apply individual extensions to enhance the natural beauty of your eyes. Using a meticulous application process, we maintain the integrity of your natural lashes so they remain healthy and undamaged.

Whether you're looking for a wispy, effortless look or want your lashes to have mega volume, our lash extension technicians are here to cater to your needs.

Here are just a few reasons why women love our eyelash extension services in Moncks Corner:

  • 24/7 Beauty
  • No Damage to Your Natural Lashes
  • No More Mascara or Eye Makeup
  • No Clumps
  • Long, Lovely Lashes That Will Make Your Friends Jealous!

If you're looking for a cost-conscious way to stand out from the crowd, contact our office today. We'd be happy to tell you more about our eyelash extension process and which lashes work best for your needs.

Smooth Out Hair and Add Flair with a Brazilian Blowout

The Brazilian blowout: you've heard about the new craze, you've seen the stunning results, but haven't had a chance to sit down and receive the treatment yourself. Luckily, Chroma Hair Studio & Spa now offers this sought-after style right here in Moncks Corner, from certified Brazilian blowout stylists.

If you suffer from dull, frizzy hair that lacks life and shine, the Brazilian blowout is one of the best ways to get smooth, frizz-free hair. By using cutting-edge bonding technology, this customizable treatment doesn't damage your hair at all. Actually, it improves your hair's health by adding a protective layer of protein that smooths your hair for weeks on end.

This ultra-popular choice offers you a laundry list of benefits, like:

  • Protection Against Seasonal Damage
  • Locks in Color
  • Cuts Down on Styling Time
  • Protects Against Heat
  • Seamless Extension Blending
  • Great for All Hair Types

To get the best of both worlds, be sure to schedule your Brazilian blowout and custom hair color treatment in the same appointment. Call us today to learn more about our Brazilian blowouts and to schedule your appointment today.

 Hair Salon Moncks Corner, SC

Custom Haircuts in Moncks Corner Crafted for You

There are many ways that you can reinvent yourself this season, but if you're ready to make a lasting impression, nothing beats a new hairstyle. While there is nothing wrong with sporting top knots, ponytails, or straight hair, a styled cut from Chroma Hair Studio & Spa will drastically improve your hair game.

Getting a new haircut isn't just fun - it makes you feel good, too, especially when you get a lot of positive compliments.

 Hair Stylist Moncks Corner, SC

Our experienced stylists are tapped into today's hottest trends, so if you want to try something new, we're here to help. If you want to play it more traditional, our stylists have a solid foundation of time-tested techniques, to give your existing cut the edge it needs to impress. And sometimes, you need something simple and low-maintenance that cuts down on styling time and primping.

Not sure what kind of a cut you need? We're happy to give you our educated opinion and are happy to provide examples of what we think works. Whatever style you've got your eye on, we can make it a reality!

Here are just a few of the most popular haircut trends in South Carolina:

Natural Textured

Natural Textured

In a time when extravagant dyes and unique hair extensions are all the rage, the natural look will always be trending. This haircut is a great way to rediscover yourself and let your beauty shine organically without overdoing it.

The Shag

The Shag

This medium-length haircut is a classic throwback to the 79s, with a layered look, messy bangs, and lots of attitude. If you like to get ahead of trends before your friends, bring back the shag and rock this retro style with pride.

Curly Bangs

Curly Bangs

This cut will look great during the summer and will give you an innocent look that will get plenty of attention. Great for a short-term haircut or even something special for a big party or Gen-X event.

Long Length

Long Length

Go against the status quo and let your hair down this season. Pixie cuts and shags are all the rage, but rocking a Rapunzel-like haircut will set you apart from the crowd. If you're looking for a more natural, classic look, this could be your haircut.

Find Your French Flair with Balayage

If you're looking to switch up your hair color but can't decide between Balayage or Ombre because, well, you don't know the difference - don't worry. You're not alone!

Balayage is a French technique for highlighting the hair in which the dye is painted to create a natural-looking effect. The goal is to create soft, subtle highlights that make your hair look like it's been kissed by the sun.

While Balayage is the technique of painting the hair, Ombre focuses on the style of the hair. It is the transition from a lighter shade to a darker shade. Typically, Ombres work best for brunettes, but the style can is suitable for blondes too. To achieve the effect of an Ombre, there must be a smooth transition between colors. While the Ombre is a beautiful look, you'll need to work with a professional to get the best results.

Luckily, we offer both Ombre and Balayage in Moncks Corner, SC! Short on time? Busy schedule? Only available on weekends? Chroma Hair Studio & Spa offers flexible appointment scheduling to accommodate even the busiest clients. You deserve a fresh new style, and we're here to help when the time is right for you.

The Top Hair Salon in Moncks Corner, SC

If you're looking for a hair salon that offers high-end styling without expensive pricing, you're in the right place. Our goal is to exceed your expectations and leave you feeling beautiful, whether you need a touch-up or a total makeover. We offer a relaxing salon atmosphere, skillful stylists, and only the best in professional brands. When it's time for your next haircut, highlight session, or eyelash extension, look no further than Chroma Hair Studio & Spa.

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Latest News in Moncks Corner, SC

Old Santee Canal Park is a quiet oasis where nature and history can be explored together

During a day trip to Old Santee Canal Park in Moncks Corner, north of Charleston, it’s not difficult to imagine life in the Lowcountry as it was 200 years ago: A swampy creek bordered by cypress trees, alligators cruising through black water, egrets wading in the shallows, and frogs croaking from behind a curtain of rustling marsh grass.All that is missing is a long, slender wooden flatboat filled with barrels of molasses, sacks of cornmeal and bales of cotton, being poled along toward the spires of the city of Charleston in the...

During a day trip to Old Santee Canal Park in Moncks Corner, north of Charleston, it’s not difficult to imagine life in the Lowcountry as it was 200 years ago: A swampy creek bordered by cypress trees, alligators cruising through black water, egrets wading in the shallows, and frogs croaking from behind a curtain of rustling marsh grass.

All that is missing is a long, slender wooden flatboat filled with barrels of molasses, sacks of cornmeal and bales of cotton, being poled along toward the spires of the city of Charleston in the distance.

Old Santee Canal Park in Moncks Corner preserves 195 acres surrounding Biggin Creek, a swampy waterway that was once the site of America’s first summit-level canal that was an engineering marvel of its day.

Backed by business leaders and some of the most famous names in colonial South Carolina — including Revolutionary War generals such as William Moultrie, Francis Marion and Thomas Sumter, and eminent figures such as John Rutledge, signer of the U.S. Constitution — the Santee Canal was an ambitious project. The canal, stretching 22 miles connected the Cooper River in Charleston with the Santee River and opened a waterway of trade to Columbia and the heart of the Carolinas.

Begun in 1793, under the direction of Lt. Col. Christian Senf, a Swedish or Danish-born engineer who had saved with the patriot army, the Santee Canal took nearly a decade to build and at its height employed over 1,000 laborers, many of whom were indentured slaves. The canal used a series of locks, built of hand-made brick, to raise and lower flatboats over a 35-foot elevation change between the Santee and Cooper rivers.

Farmers and traders from the midlands to the mountains could more easily sell their goods in Charleston, and merchants there could ship their wares far inland. Despite its success, the Santee Canal was soon overtaken by railroads and this new technology rendered it obsolete.

A section of the Santee Canal is preserved at Old Santee Canal Park in Moncks Corner, and when you visit today, you will be fascinated by the unique history, and amazed at the natural beauty of the park. When you arrive you will encounter the 11,000-square-foot interpretive center, the entrance to which is a replica of an old canal lock.

Inside, the well-maintained building houses a museum outlining the history of the canal, the technology behind its construction and the cultural impact of its success. The natural world is celebrated, too, as a giant live oak highlights the oak bluff ecosystem surrounding the park, and live examples of Lowcountry wildlife can be viewed.

There are guided tours, educational programs and special events held year-round that make Old Santee Canal Park a facet of culture that benefits young and old alike.

Outside, more than four miles of boardwalks and trails crisscross Biggin Creek and the swampy canal trace. Wildlife abounds and can be easily seen from well-sited viewing areas.

Canoes and kayaks are available to explore the waterway, too. While watercraft speed by in the nearby Tailrace Canal, life in Old Santee Canal Park remains a quiet oasis where nature and history can be explored together. This history also includes nearby Stony Landing and the 1843 plantation house that still sits high on the bluff over the river it once served.

Here was a hub of trade from colonial times and during the Civil War it became known for another important role: The small semisubmersible “Little David” was built, and armed with a torpedo, was sent against the Union fleet blockading Charleston. There it successfully damaged a Union ironclad and made history.

A replica of the “Little David” can be seen on the grounds of Old Santee Canal Park at the Berkeley County Museum, and inside the park’s interpretive center.

For a day of adventure through history, a glimpse at a fascinating technology of the past, and a walk on the wild side, Old Santee Canal Park in Moncks Corner is well-worth a visit.

Old Santee Canal Park in Moncks Corner in Berkeley County is located at 900 Stoney Landing Road., is just under two hours from the Beaufort area and very easy to find.

Take U.S. 17 toward Charleston to Ravenel and turn left onto S.C. 165. Take 165 to Summerville and take a right onto U.S. 17A toward Moncks Corner. In Moncks Corner, turn right onto Mountain Pine Road and turn left at U.S. 52. Follow the signs to Old Santee Canal Park and turn right onto Stoney Landing Road.

Old Santee Canal Park is open year-round from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $5 per person, $3 for seniors and children under 6 free. Guided tours and group rates are available and there are numerous educational and cultural programs throughout the year.

For more information on Old Santee Canal Park, call 843-899-5200 or visit https://www.oldsanteecanalpark.org

Kitfield property investor staying off private road: Concerns over Main St.-bound car travel remain in Moncks Corner

In an effort to quell homeowners along the southern terminus of Vanihayn Drive in Moncks Corner, Charleston-based developer Wofford Stribling recently agreed to close off access from a portion of his Kitfield development project to ward off increased congestion for the concerned residents in question.Those intentions were communicated during an Aug. 23 Moncks Corner Planning and Zoning meeting at the local Town Hall venue at 118 W. Carolina Ave.The story begins with the applicant (Stribling) receiving approval from Town Council...

In an effort to quell homeowners along the southern terminus of Vanihayn Drive in Moncks Corner, Charleston-based developer Wofford Stribling recently agreed to close off access from a portion of his Kitfield development project to ward off increased congestion for the concerned residents in question.

Those intentions were communicated during an Aug. 23 Moncks Corner Planning and Zoning meeting at the local Town Hall venue at 118 W. Carolina Ave.

The story begins with the applicant (Stribling) receiving approval from Town Council in December 2020 to attain rezoning for the addition of 160 new homes at what’s known as the Kitfield Road subdivision.

Subsequently, the builder informed the planning and zoning commission of his plans to annex an additional 16.02-acre tract along Vanihayn Drive, yielding a maximum of 33 units.

Upon hearing of this, one family owning property on each side of Vanihayn Drive opposed the prospect of allowing new residents of Stribling’s development to drive in and out of the proposed residential complex using their private road.

Those sentiments were communicated to Stribling and the commission during a July 26 public session.

During the following meeting on Aug. 23, the speculator confirmed claims that Vanihayn Drive was indeed a private roadway and thus assured affected stakeholders that he would place emergency access gates that could only be unlocked by first-responders during crisis situations. These structures would be installed on Vanihayn Drive and Prospect Drive.

Community Development Director Douglas Polen explained: “No one from this development or this new annexed part will be able to get onto Vanihayn Drive past [a certain point] or onto Prospect.”

Moncks Corner Planning & Zoning Commissioner Connor Salisbury affirmed that outside access to Vanihayn Drive via an existing “through-put” would be terminated by the new gates.

Kitfield community president and resident Riley G. McKelvey asked for further clarification.

“We want to make sure that in our community we’re taken care of ... we want to keep light traffic right now. But we want to make sure we don’t impede anyone else’s property as well because we pay taxes. The last thing I want happening is that someone comes in and says, ‘You know what? We’re going to take this, we’re not going through that — it ain’t happening,’” he stated.

Other community members in attendance asked the planning and zoning commission to properly inform them of new additions/renovations that could affect homeowners in the future. Some of them felt that a sign reporting the July meeting was poorly placed in an area where it wasn’t readily visible to locals.

Area resident Carole Williams, however, expressed her apprehension about all of the traffic from the new development spilling over to the west end of Kitfield Road, as drivers would only be afforded one-way in and one way out on that stretch. Cars traversing that path, she added, would end turning on Broughton Road or California Avenue, while headed toward West Main Street.

Stribling reported that a DOT traffic study had been completed to focus on traffic mitigation for vehicles emanating from the Kitfield development. As a result of conferring with the government agency, the land developer stated that he would install a right-hand turn lane from Kitfield Road onto Broughton Road. In order to facilitate the insertion of that lane, he continued, Broughton Road would be widened. Furthermore, residents also learned that the entire intersection would also be restriped.

Williams countered that she is more distressed about making a left turn from Broughton Road to West Main Street rather than going right.

Salisbury told Williams that issue would be addressed when his group composes their next comprehensive plan.

In the meantime, Stribling communicated his willingness to contribute to the Community Redevelopment Program, whereby all residents of the surrounding Kitfield community would receive between $500-$1,000 per lot for infrastructure improvements.

Hitting all the right notes: Alterea and friends delivering jazz and more in Moncks Corner

In what she describes as a comeback outing of sorts, jazz vocalist Alterea Baxter is set to take the stage with Terrance Bryant and Sherlyn “Dee Dee” Johnson on Sept. 10 as part of a music spectacular hosted by the Berkeley County Library System (BCLS) at the Berkeley County Administration Building.Baxter, 62, plans on emerging from her COVID-fueled hiatus by kicking off the 4 p.m. show with a segment of classic jazz standards and later adding a dash of R&B and sprinkle of soul to the late-summer affair.The glob...

In what she describes as a comeback outing of sorts, jazz vocalist Alterea Baxter is set to take the stage with Terrance Bryant and Sherlyn “Dee Dee” Johnson on Sept. 10 as part of a music spectacular hosted by the Berkeley County Library System (BCLS) at the Berkeley County Administration Building.

Baxter, 62, plans on emerging from her COVID-fueled hiatus by kicking off the 4 p.m. show with a segment of classic jazz standards and later adding a dash of R&B and sprinkle of soul to the late-summer affair.

The global pandemic combined with two recent corneal transplants temporarily forced the current Goose Creek resident to put her live performances on the shelf, but now the veteran entertainer is declaring herself primed and ready to dazzle audiences with her unmistakable crooning ability.

As an unabashed aficionado of the golden era of jazz, Baxter recommends that the uninitiated to the genre take in a sampling of Sarah Vaughan, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday and other masters to capture the true essence of the music form that originated in African-American communities of New Orleans, Louisiana.

“Get into those songs because that’s where you’re going to find all your jazz notes. That’s where you’re going to be introduced to that flow that other genres do not carry,” observed the native of Downtown Charleston, who has been singing on a professional level over a period of four decades.

“The golden era ... that’s my favorite because that’s where the meat of jazz is. That’s where the notes are that will give you the feel of loving jazz,” she adds.

Since her reemergence, many of her go-to performance venues have gone out of business, including a number of restaurants, due to COVID. However, the loving mother and grandmother has designs on continuing her stage work at banquet halls and senior homes in the St. Stephens, Moncks Corner areas and beyond. In the past, she’s toured the southeast in markets, such as Panama City, Florida and Atlanta, Georgia.

When Baxter isn’t putting on a show for her adoring fans, she serves as a vocal coach for those hoping to hone their skills.

“I’m always vocalizing at home. My studio is right here in my living room. I periodically, on Mondays, teach lessons.”

A point of emphasis in her lessons is what she calls “lip trills,” which are prescribed by the voice expert to put the body in proper positioning to ensure both healthy singing and speaking.

“It sounds crazy, but it works,” Baxter assures. “It’s the best thing you can do as far as putting your voice where it needs to be.”

As for tips she dispenses for aspiring acts on the come, Alterea advises folks to hire a reliable booking agent and assembling a quality bio and references. But beyond that, she encourages people who are serious about their craft to simply sing as frequently as possible on stage, in the car or in the shower.

Baxter’s Sept. 10 show promises to be a joyous experience, as she plans to belt out a collection of feel-good tunes, including hits from Michael Buble, Frank Sinatra, Bobby Caldwell and other well-known music icons.

For more information on Baxter’s upcoming schedule or her training availability, email her at pamperme_23@yahoo.com.

Santee Cooper Testing Santee Dam Sirens During Full-Scale Exercise on Aug. 23

MONCKS CORNER, S.C. – Beginning at 9 a.m. on Aug. 23, Santee Cooper will carry out a full-scale exercise to test Santee Cooper’s Emergency Action Plan for Dam Failure. As part of the exercise, Santee Cooper will test its sirens located below the Santee Dam and in the Santee River floodplain between 9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. The exercise will involve various municipal, county, state and federal agencies.“Safety is a priority at Santee Cooper. This test is a way to make sure our warning equipment is working properly in ...

MONCKS CORNER, S.C. – Beginning at 9 a.m. on Aug. 23, Santee Cooper will carry out a full-scale exercise to test Santee Cooper’s Emergency Action Plan for Dam Failure. As part of the exercise, Santee Cooper will test its sirens located below the Santee Dam and in the Santee River floodplain between 9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. The exercise will involve various municipal, county, state and federal agencies.

“Safety is a priority at Santee Cooper. This test is a way to make sure our warning equipment is working properly in the unlikely event there is a problem with the Santee Dam,” said Shea McMakin, Santee Cooper Chief Dam Safety Engineer. “The full-scale exercise also allows personnel from Santee Cooper and other agencies to get hands-on practice of our safety plan.”

There are 15 siren sites, which can be activated remotely from Santee Cooper’s Energy Control Center in Moncks Corner, located throughout the floodplain.

Also scheduled for testing on Aug. 23 are some 650 tone-alert radios issued to floodplain residents in Berkeley, Charleston, Clarendon, Georgetown and Williamsburg counties. The radios are activated by the National Weather Service in coordination with Santee Cooper. Santee Cooper’s telephone-based warning system for the floodplain will be exercised as well.

The Santee Dam, which rests upon Lake Marion, is 4.5 miles long and 40 feet tall and has a floodplain that reaches about 650 residences between the dam and the Atlantic Ocean. In addition to Santee Cooper, federal, state and local agencies will be participating in the exercise, including National Weather Service; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; the South Carolina’s Emergency Management and Law Enforcement divisions and the departments of Public Safety, Natural Resources, and Health and Environmental Control; and Berkeley, Charleston, Clarendon, Georgetown and Williamsburg counties’ emergency preparedness divisions and/or sheriff offices.

Santee Cooper is South Carolina’s largest power provider, the ultimate source of electricity for 2 million people across the state, and one of America’s Best Midsize Employers as named by Forbes. Through its low-cost, reliable and environmentally responsible electricity and water services, and through innovative partnerships and initiatives that attract and retain industry and jobs, Santee Cooper helps power South Carolina. To learn more, visit www.santeecooper.com and follow #PoweringSC on social media.

Animal shelters in SC are at a breaking point. Pet adoptions can’t keep up with intake

Too many animals, not enough space — that’s been the mantra of humane societies and shelters throughout South Carolina for months.The Charleston Animal Society on Sept. 1 called the situation a state of emergency, saying that almost every shelter in the state is “at the breaking point.”Dorchester Paws took in 21 cats and kittens on Aug. 27 after a home burned down in Summerville, maxing out the already at-capacity shelter. In nearby Moncks Corner, Berkeley Animal Center has been in their new, larger buil...

Too many animals, not enough space — that’s been the mantra of humane societies and shelters throughout South Carolina for months.

The Charleston Animal Society on Sept. 1 called the situation a state of emergency, saying that almost every shelter in the state is “at the breaking point.”

Dorchester Paws took in 21 cats and kittens on Aug. 27 after a home burned down in Summerville, maxing out the already at-capacity shelter. In nearby Moncks Corner, Berkeley Animal Center has been in their new, larger building for a little over a year, but has so many animals it has resorted to using pop-up cages.

The Horry County Animal Care Center in Conway has had to temporarily close to treat animals after taking in over 170 animals in August.

In the upstate, Greenville County Animal Care has so many animals it is euthanizing some for space — something they hate doing, said Paula Church, the shelter’s community relations coordinator.

She said they look at animals with behavioral issues — for example, if a dog had bitten a child — and severe medical issues that would require lots of time and expense.

“If we had the time, we could find placement for them,” Church said. “But we don’t have months and months to find space for animals that have behavior and medical issues.”

Part of the problem was caused by the winding down of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns, which at first took the burden off shelters as more people adopted pets to keep families busy or to be company for employees working from home.

Joe Elmore, president and CEO of Charleston Animal Society, said shelters had been anticipating intake numbers to increase after that initial adoption surge. When lockdowns first began in 2020, the American Veterinary Medical Association recommended all veterinarians in the country pull back from elective procedures, such as spaying and neutering, so it would not tax the healthcare system.

“We usually do about 10,000 surgeries a year,” Elmore said. “But in the spring of 2020, when hospitals were overwhelmed, we stopped doing those elective type of procedures. We only did what was necessary and pulled back the number of public spay-neutering.”

Elmore said shelters are now seeing the results of putting off those surgeries, with more animals being born than there are people who can keep them.

Other factors also are at play. Of the 75 animal shelters in South Carolina, 75 percent of them do not have a veterinarian on staff, according to Elmore. This makes adoption harder because state law mandates the animals cannot be adopted unless they are fixed.

State law also says an animal that is brought to a shelter must be held for five days before being treated.

As people move in, animals move out

In areas like Charleston County, growth and development are also a factor in overcrowding. As more people and buildings push strays and feral animals out of their natural habitat, more of those animals are surrendered to shelters.

“We get calls from time to time here with people saying, ‘I’ve gotten deer in my yard, and I’ve never had deer in my yard.’ It’s because they’re being flushed out from the development,” Elmore said. “The same thing will happen with feral cats and dogs. Folks will then start calling animal control, animal control will go out and start bringing more and more of these animals in.”

Dorchester Paws, which has been operating over maximum capacity and been “in crisis mode” all summer, understands that growth and development in the Summerville area is having a huge impact on animals. Danielle Zuck, marketing and development director, said there are plans for Dorchester Paws to get a new, bigger building.

“Our building was designed to be a holding facility 50 years ago,” Zuck said. “It was not designed to have taken 4,000 animals a year, and that’s the number that we’re anticipating taking this year, if not more.”

Usually, Dorchester Paws takes in about 10 to 15 animals per day on average, Zuck said. Recently, it has been taking in 15 to 35 animals per day. That, combined with slower adoptions, is playing a big part in the overcrowding of the shelter.

“We’re constantly playing this jigsaw game of animals,” Zuck said.

Not only is the building old and too small to accommodate all of those pets, it also is in a flood zone. Every time it rains, Dorchester Paws is flooded and the animals in kennels are stuck standing in water, Zuck said. The staff has to take buckets to try and empty the shelter of floodwater.

In December, Dorchester Paws purchased land along Highway 17A — not in a flood zone. Now they’re in the midst of a financial campaign to help fund a new building on the property, one that will include a spay and neuter clinic. They are still in the process of figuring out the cost of building, but it’s estimated to cost somewhere between $3 and $8 million.

Zuck said Dorchester Paws is excited the new location will be in a growing neighborhood, right by the Palms and Summer’s Corner.

“Summerville is one of the fastest growing cities,” Zuck said. “We need the shelter badly in order to provide for the new population that’s coming in.”

A new building will also help Dorchester Paws elevate its status as a shelter, she added.

“A lot of people still don’t know that Dorchester Paws exists. They either call us the pound, or they don’t know where we’re located,” Zuck said. “A new shelter will just bring this brand up and elevate our mission for the animals.”

Right now, Dorchester Paws has over 400 animals in their care, with almost half of them living in a kennel or pop-up in the shelter.

Zuck said the shelter has made Dorchester Paws’ adoption process simple over the past year to try and incentivize people to adopt: just a one-page application, reduced fees and a conversation with an adoption counselor.

“We have removed all barriers from the adoption process,” Zuck said. “We want animals to be placed in loving homes.”

Zuck said it is hard to say why adoptions have been slow, but there could be several reasons: summer vacation, back-to-school, current world affairs.

One thing that isn’t a factor is a significant uptick in pets adopted in 2020 going back to shelters. Elmore said it is a myth that people surrendered their animals as soon as they returned to work.

“We saw some people who were returning to work actually coming back to adopt a companion animal for the animal,” Elmore said.

Finding homes

As a result of most shelters in the state being overcrowded, some are partnering up to ship animals to others that don’t have as many animals.

Elmore, of Charleston Animals Society, said they’ve started a statewide transport program where his staff takes animals to other local shelters, and even ones out of state. Some shelters Charleston Animals Society partners with include Hallie Hill Animal Sanctuary in Hollywood and the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty for Animals.

Church, of Greenville County Animal Care, said the shelter partners with rescue organizations almost daily to transport animals to other shelters. Some organizations they partner with include the Animal Sanctuary Society (New Jersey), Hearts of the North Rescue (Minnesota), Jackson’s Legacy (New York) and Lovable Mutts Adoption Center (Pennsylvania).

Tiffany Hoffman, event coordinator for Berkeley Animal Center, said the shelter is lined up with pop-ups.

“As much as I don’t want a dog in a pop-up, it’s still saving a life,” Hoffman said.

The center has recently relocated to a bigger building with more amenities, including a surgical suite, a meet-and-greet room and play yards. After being in the new building for 14 months, Hoffman said the staff are grateful they now have more space and are able to not just take better care of the animals they have, but also take in more.

“We are able to care for more animals, but with that, we need more fosters. We need more volunteers, more adopters,” Hoffman said. “With (the new building) comes the need for the community.”

Hoffman said there are many community members that already help. Those who foster pets are essential.

“We have a very hardworking staff, but we could not save the thousands of animals without the fosters,” Hoffman said.

Hoffman said fostering from Berkeley Animal Center is completely free, and they have a 24/7 phone service for fosters in case they have questions about the animal they’re taking care of. She said the center also provides food crates and medical care.

“We literally give everything needed,” Hoffman said. “They just have to give the love.”

Hoffman said the staff — a group of just over 10 — often fosters animals as well.

“Our staff work here because they love animals,” Hoffman said. “If you work in animal rescue, if you work in an animal shelter, you do it because of your love of an animal.”

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